Browse "Athletes"

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Steve Yzerman

Stephen "Steve" Gregory Yzerman, hockey player, general manager (born 9 May 1965 in Cranbrook, BC). National Hockey League (NHL) superstar Steve Yzerman, a career Detroit Red Wing known for his exceptional sportsmanship and leadership abilities, is the longest-serving captain in the league's history. Yzerman was captain of the Detroit Red Wings from 1986 to 2006, and led the team to three Stanley Cup victories. In 2002, he won an Olympic gold medal as part of the men’s hockey team. He was also executive director of the men’s hockey teams that won Olympic gold in 2010 and 2014. Yzerman became vice president of the Detroit Red Wings following his retirement as a player, and in 2010 became general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Macleans

Steve Yzerman (Profile)

There are stories for every scar on Steve Yzerman's otherwise handsome mug, and they are not for the faint of heart. They tell of a man who, though comparatively slight by modern National Hockey League standards (five-11, 185 lb.), isn't afraid of the rough going.

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Stories of Remembrance: Catriona Le May Doan

In 2005, to commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the end of the Second World War, Canadian celebrities spoke about the meaning of remembrance as part of the Stories of Remembrance Campaign, a project of CanWest News Service (now Postmedia News), the Dominion Institute (now Historica Canada) and Veterans Affairs Canada. This article is reprinted from that campaign.

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Sunny's Halo

Sunny's Halo, racehorse (b at Oshawa, Ont 11 Feb 1980; d at Bullard, Texas 3 June 2003). Sired by Halo out of Mostly Sunny, he was only the second Canadian-owned and -bred thoroughbred to win the Kentucky Derby (after NORTHERN DANCER). Owned by D.J.

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Sylvia Burka

Sylvia Burka, speed skater, cyclist, coach (b at Winnipeg 4 May 1954). Through hard work and determination, she overcame a visual handicap to become a world-class athlete in 2 sports. Despite losing an eye in a childhood accident, Burka was Canada's national junior SPEED-SKATING champion by age 15.

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Sylvie Bernier

Sylvie Bernier, diver (b at Québec C 31 Jan 1964). Bernier was introduced to diving at age 9 by her older brother, who brought her along to his lessons for company. She took to diving immediately and within 2 years had won

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Sylvie Daigle

Sylvie Daigle, speed skater (b at Sherbrooke, Qc 1 Dec 1962). Daigle discovered speed skating at the age of nine when she went to the arena to play hockey and met some speed skaters who invited her to join them. It was the beginning of a real passion.

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Sylvie Frechette

It was not until after Waldo's retirement, however, that Sylvie Frechette blossomed. She exploded onto the world stage by winning the 1991 world solo championship and was the early favourite to capture gold at the 1992 Olympic Games.

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Tara Whitten

During her undergraduate years at the UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA, Whitten ran cross country as a member of the U of A Pandas team.

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Ted Kennedy

Hardworking and tenacious, Ted Kennedy typified the powerful, tough checking Maple Leaf teams built by Conn SMYTHE. In 1946 he and players Howie Meeker and Vic Lynn formed the renowned KLM Line, which helped the Leafs to another 3 Stanley Cup victories from 1947-49.

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Ted Lindsay

Robert Blake Theodore Lindsay, "Terrible Ted," hockey player (born 29 July 1925 in Renfrew, ON; died 4 March 2019 in Oakland, Michigan). Small in stature at 173 cm (5' 8") and only 73 kg (160 pounds), Ted Lindsay was nonetheless known as one of the most aggressive players in the National Hockey League (NHL).

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Terrance Richard Duff

Terrance Richard "Dick" Duff, hockey player, coach (b at Kirkland Lake, Ont, 18 Feb 1936). Dick Duff had a distinguished career in the NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE as both a player and coach.

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Terry Evanshen

Terrance Anthony Evanshen, football player (b at Montreal 13 June 1944). During a 14-year career in the CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE he developed into one of the most skilled pass receivers in CFL history.

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Terry Fox

Terrance Stanley Fox, CC, Order of the Dogwood, athlete, humanitarian, cancer research activist (born 28 July 1958 in WinnipegMB; died 28 June 1981 in New WestminsterBC). After losing his right leg to cancer at age 18, Terry Fox decided to run across Canada to raise awareness and money for cancer research. With the use of a customized running prothesis, he set out from St. John’s, Newfoundland, on 12 April 1980 and covered 5,373 km in 143 days — an average of 42 km (26 miles) per day. He was forced to stop his Marathon of Hope in Thunder Bay, Ontario, on 1 September 1980, when cancer had invaded his lungs. He died shortly before his 23rd birthday. The youngest person to be made a Companion of the Order of Canada, he was awarded the 1980 Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s athlete of the year and was named a Person of National Historic Significance by the Government of Canada. He was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and has had many schools, institutions and landmarks named in his honour. The annual Terry Fox Run has raised more than $800 million for cancer research. The Marathon of Hope raised $24 million by February 1981.  

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Terry Sawchuk

Terrence Gordon Sawchuk, hockey goalkeeper (b at Winnipeg 28 Dec 1929; d at New York 31 May 1970). He played junior hockey in Winnipeg and Galt, Ont, turning professional at age 17 with Omaha.

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Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir

Tessa Virtue, figure skater (born 17 May 1989 in London, ON) and Scott Moir, figure skater (born 2 September 1987 in London, ON). Virtue and Moir are the most successful Canadian ice dance team of the early 21st century, and were the first North Americans to win the Olympic Gold Medal for ice dance, at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games. At the 2014 Olympic Games in Sochi, they won silver in ice dance and in the team competition. They won gold in ice dance and in the team competition at the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang, becoming the most decorated figure skaters in Olympic history. They have also won four world championships (three senior and one junior), three Four Continents championships, nine Canadian championships (eight senior and one junior) and multiple Grand Prix events, including a Grand Prix Final.