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Toronto Feature: Massey Hall

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

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Toronto Feature: Naaz Theatre

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Editorial

Vancouver Feature: Little Tramp Graces the Orpheum Stage

When a troupe of English Music Hall entertainers swept through Vancouver in 1911, the star was an acrobatic little comedian who would soon become one of the most famous people in the world: Charlie Chaplin. Another player would carve his own niche in entertainment history, too. Arthur Stanley Jefferson became a beloved star after he changed his name to Stan Laurel and teamed up on film with Oliver Hardy.

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Festival Theatre

The term "festival theatre" emerged in England in the nineteenth century to refer to special theatrical performances mounted to celebrate exceptional authors or dates. The festival held in 1864 at Stratford-Upon-Avon, England, to mark the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth is an early example.

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Music in Fredericton

Fredericton, NB. New Brunswick's capital city, located on the Saint John River on the site of a 1732 Acadian, and later Loyalist English, settlement at St Anne's Point. The name Fredericton was adopted in 1785. Incorporation as a city was accomplished in 1848.

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Music in Guelph

Guelph, Ont. Founded 1827 by John Galt in the heart of agricultural Ontario and incorporated in 1879. In 1846 there were 1240 people living in Guelph. By 1988 the population had reached 80,786 including a large Italian.community.

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Music in Halifax

Capital of Nova Scotia and major seaport established in 1749 as a British settlement (population 2500) and military base. The influx of Loyalists resulting from the American Revolution caused the population to rise to about 9000 by 1800.

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Windsor Hall/Salle Windsor

Later, concerts were given in the hotel's ballroom, which also bore the name Windsor Hall. Among concerts held in the ballroom known as the Ladies Ordinary of the Windsor were those by the Dubois String Quartet, who played there regularly from 1915 until 1927.

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Massey Hall

Known as “Canada’s Carnegie Hall,” Massey Hall is Canada’s oldest and most venerated concert hall. It opened in 1894 and was the home of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir until 1982. The site of many historic events and performances, it has been repeatedly voted Canada’s Best Live Music Venue Over 1,500 Seats and Venue of the Year by Canadian music industry associations. It is a National Historic Site and a heritage site in the City of Toronto. It will be closed for two years as of 2 July 2018 to allow for a $142-million renovation.

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Shaftesbury Hall

Shaftesbury Hall. The auditorium in Toronto's first YMCA, built at Queen and James streets in 1872 to designs by the architects Smith and Gemmel. The hall was on the ground floor with a direct entrance from the street, a double gallery, and a seating capacity of about 1700.

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Music in Hamilton

City on Lake Ontario with a natural bay as harbour. Taking its name from George H. Hamilton (1787-1835), who laid it out in 1813, the town was incorporated as a city in 1846 when, with a population of 10,000, it was the second-largest city in Upper Canada.

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Hamilton Place

Hamilton Place (formally Ronald V. Joyce Centre for the Performing Arts at Hamilton Place). Multi-purpose arts centre, situated on Main St in downtown Hamilton, Ont.