Browse "Arts & Culture"

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The Hermitage/L'Ermitage

Ermitage. Hall located in a Collège de Montréal building at the corner of Côte-des-Neiges and Docteur-Penfield Ave. Built by architect Joseph Alfred-Hector Lapierre (1859-1932) between 1911 and 1913 to provide needed space for the college, it was first used for student productions and recreation.

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North Hills Museum

North Hills Museum is located in Granville Ferry, NS, on the shores of the historic Annapolis Basin. The museum is housed in a 200-year-old "salt box" house originally known as Rumsey Farm.

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Music in Saint-Hyacinthe

A city in Quebec on the Yamaska River, some 50 km east of Montreal. Founded in 1748, a municipality in 1849, and a town in 1857, it was named after the patron saint of Jacques-Hyacinthe-Simon Delorme, the local seigneur.

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Music in Saskatoon

Saskatchewan city founded in 1882 as a temperance colony by pioneers from Ontario. It was incorporated as a town, with a population of 544, in 1903, and as a city, with five times that number, in 1906.

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Music in Peterborough

Ontario city on the Otonabee River (part of the Trent-Severn Waterway). It was settled ca 1820 by County Cork Irish, was named Peterborough in 1827, and was incorporated in 1905. It developed into a lumbering and milling town.

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Music in Sherbrooke

City in southern Quebec, located about as far south of Quebec City as it is east of Montreal. With its suburbs it has a population reaching about 129,000 (1990); it has been called 'Queen of the Eastern Townships' or of 'L'Estrie,' the more recent name for the area.

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Music in New Westminster

City east of Vancouver near the mouth of the Fraser River. After its designation (1859, incorporation 1860) as the capital city of British Columbia it was named New Westminster by Queen Victoria, and hence nicknamed 'The Royal City.

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Music in Moncton

New Brunswick city originally known as LeCoude and first settled in 1750 by Acadians. The Acadians were dispersed in 1758 but returned in sufficient numbers to constitute a fundamental segment of the Moncton community.

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Music in Kitchener-Waterloo

Twin cities in southwestern Ontario. In both, a significant proportion of the population has always been of German and Mennonite stock. Kitchener, the larger of the two cities, was called Ebytown until 1824 and Berlin until 1916.

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Music in Sudbury

Sudbury, Ont. Mining community in northern Ontario. Settled in 1883 and incorporated as city in 1930, Sudbury by 1986 had a population of 88,717 from a variety of national origins.

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Music in Stratford

Ontario town (Little Thames until 1831) located on the Avon River 75 kilometres west of Hamilton, in Perth County, and incorporated as a city in 1885. It was the site of railway shops ca. 1871-1964 and became the home of the Stratford Festival in 1953.

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Music in Kingston

City at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, founded by Frontenac as Fort Cataraqui in 1673 and later renamed Fort Frontenac. It was captured by the British in 1758 and named Kingston in 1783 by Loyalists fleeing from New York.

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Music in Rimouski

City situated on the south shore of the St Lawrence River, 300 kilometres east of Quebec City. The name, meaning 'moose sanctuary,' comes from the Micmac language.

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Music in Sorel

City situated 60 km east of Montreal at the junction of the St Lawrence and Richelieu rivers on the former site of Fort Richelieu, built in 1642, and the seigneury given in 1672 to Pierre de Saurel, a captain in the Carignan-Salières Regiment.

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Music in Sarnia

Ontario city settled in 1807. It was known first as Fort Rapids, later as Port Sarnia, and in 1856 it was incorporated as the town of Sarnia. It became a city in 1914. Its population was 49,033 in 1986.