Browse "Rivers"

Article

Anderson River

Anderson River, 692 km long, originates in a group of lakes north of Great Bear Lake in the Northwest Territories and meanders north and west to empty into Liverpool Bay, an arm of the Beaufort Sea, just east of the Mackenzie Delta.

Article

Arctic Red River

The Arctic Red River flows 499 km north-northwest from glaciers in the North Mackenzie Mountains, crossing 4 mountain ranges before it winds its way through the Mackenzie Lowlands, crossing the Arctic Circle and joining the MACKENZIE RIVER just south of the Mackenzie River Delta.

Article

Athabasca River

The Athabasca River is the longest river in Alberta (1,538 km). The first 168 km (located in Jasper National Park) are designated as a Canadian Heritage River. As a tributary to the Mackenzie River, water flowing on the Athabasca River eventually drains into the Arctic Ocean. River flow is highest during the summer and lowest during winter, and it is ice-covered from mid-November to mid-April.

Article

Attawapiskat River

Attawapiskat River, 748 km long, formed by the confluence of the Pineimuta, Trading and Otoskwin rivers at Attawapiskat Lake, in northeastern Ontario, flows east, jogs north and runs east to the flatland by James Bay. Its drainage area is 50 200 km2 and its mean discharge 626 m3/s.

Article

Back River

Back River, 974 km long, rises in Contwoyto Lake, north of Great Slave Lake, NWT, and flows northeast across the Barren Lands of Nunavut to Chantrey Inlet, south of King William Island.

Article

Drainage Basin

A drainage basin is an area of land that contributes the water it receives as precipitation to a river or network of rivers.

Article

Bloodvein River

Named, perhaps, for the red granite stripes running through the bedrock near its source, the Bloodvein River begins in the vast wilderness of the Canadian Shield, 600 km northwest of Thunder Bay, Ont, and 500 km northeast of Winnipeg.

Article

Bow River

​The Bow River runs through the most populated region of Alberta, intersecting cities such as Banff, Canmore, Cochrane and Calgary.

Article

Rivière Chaudière

Rivière Chaudière, 193 km long and with a basin 6690 km2, is located in southern Québec. It is named after the waters that "boil" from its falls or after the numerous glacial erosion kettles (chaudière is French for boiler and also for bucket).

Article

St Clair River

St Clair River, 64 km long, flows in a southerly direction, connecting Lake HURON in the N with Lake ST CLAIR in the S, and forms the international boundary between Canada and the US. Its northern portion has an average width of 0.8 km and depth of 8-18 m.

Article

Clearwater River

Clearwater River, 280 km long, rises in Patterson, Forest and Lloyd lakes in northwest Saskatchewan, flows southeast to Careen Lake and abruptly turns west to join the ATHABASCA RIVER at Fort McMurray, Alberta.

Article

Columbia River

The Columbia River runs from the southeast corner of British Columbia through Washington and Oregon states to the Pacific Ocean.