Browse "Geographical features"

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Cape Blomidon

Cape Blomidon lies along the southeast shore of the Bay of Fundy at the mouth of Minas Basin, the site of some of the world's highest tides.

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Bloodvein River

Named, perhaps, for the red granite stripes running through the bedrock near its source, the Bloodvein River begins in the vast wilderness of the Canadian Shield, 600 km northwest of Thunder Bay, Ont, and 500 km northeast of Winnipeg.

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Bloody Falls

Bloody Falls are rapids located about 15 km above the mouth of the Coppermine River in the central Arctic.

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Blue Mountains

The Blue Mountains (Montagnes Bleues) is a 240 km long group of high hills along the Canada and United States border in the Eastern Townships.

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Île Bonaventure

Despite its minute size, a favourable climate and abundant cod stocks induced French entrepreneurs to establish a seasonal fishery operation there in the 1600s. Simon Denys obtained seigneurial title (1674); his son Pierre had a chapel erected, soon thereafter razed by fire (1690).

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Boothia Peninsula

The Boothia Peninsula, 32 300 km2, the northernmost tip of mainland North America, juts some 250 km north into the Arctic Archipelago, separated from Somerset Island by Bellot Strait, which is a mere 2 km wide.

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Gulf of Boothia

The Gulf of Boothia is entered through Prince Regent Inlet. To the east it is bounded by the northwest coast of BAFFIN ISLAND, and to the west by the BOOTHIA PENINSULA. Depths are generally about 275 m, decreasing southward.

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Borden Island

Borden Island, 2794 km2, is one of the Queen Elizabeth group of islands in the High Arctic. Most of the island is part of the Northwest Territories; the easternmost part of the island is part of Nunavut.

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Bow River

​The Bow River runs through the most populated region of Alberta, intersecting cities such as Banff, Canmore, Cochrane and Calgary.

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Bras d'Or Lake

Bras d'Or Lake, 1099 km2, is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean occupying the centre of Cape Breton Island that nearly divides the island in two. On the north it is linked to the ocean by a narrow channel down the west side of Boularderie Island.

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Bruce Peninsula

Owen Sound and Colpoys Bay form fjordlike harbours on Georgian Bay. Cape Croker, projecting 10 km into the bay, is an Ojibwa reserve. Adjacent Hope Bay is famous for its sheer limestone cliffs and sandy beach. At Lion's Head a jagged rock formation 51 m high gives the site its name.

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Brunette Island

Brunette Island, 20 km2, is situated at the mouth of Fortune B on Newfoundland's S coast, 18 km S of Connaigre Head. The island, roughly triangular, measures 11 km E-W and 6 km N-S. A steep ridge backs the NW shore, at one point rising to 160 m.

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Bylot Island

Bylot Island, 11 067 km2, is nestled into the northeastern corner of Baffin Island at the entrance to Lancaster Sound.

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Cabot Strait

Cabot Strait, the passage between southwest Newfoundland and Cape Breton Island. Named for explorer John Cabot, it is 110 km wide between Cape Ray, Nfld, and Cape North, NS.

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New Caledonia

 New Caledonia ("New Scotland"), was a name given in 1806 to the central and highland plateau area of BRITISH COLUMBIA by Simon FRASER, a partner, trader and explorer in the NORTH WEST CO.

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Continental Divides in Canada

A continental divide is a ridge or natural boundary of elevated terrain that separates the drainage basins of a continent. Each drainage basin contributes its water to river systems, which in turn flow into distinct larger bodies of water, such as oceans. The main continental divide in Canada follows the ridge of the Rocky Mountains.