Browse "Geographical features"

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Chute Montmorency

Chute Montmorency, located 13 km east of Québec City at the mouth of Rivière Montmorency where it empties into the St Lawrence River, is the highest waterfall in the province of Québec and the eighth-highest in Canada.

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Lake St. Clair

Lake St. Clair, 1,114 km, elevation 175 m, average depth 3.7 m, is bordered by the province of Ontario to the east and the state of Michigan to the west. Almost circular in shape, it has a length of 42 km and a maximum width of 39 km. It is connected to Lake Huron to the north by the St. Clair River and drains into Lake Erie to the south via the Detroit River. Lake St. Clair is part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, a significant transportation route stretching from Lake Superior through the Great Lakes to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The cities of Windsor, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, are located at the southwest end of the lake, making it a popular site for recreational fishing and boating.

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St Clair River

St Clair River, 64 km long, flows in a southerly direction, connecting Lake HURON in the N with Lake ST CLAIR in the S, and forms the international boundary between Canada and the US. Its northern portion has an average width of 0.8 km and depth of 8-18 m.

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Lac à l' Eau Claire

Lac à l'Eau Claire, 1383 km2, elevation 241 m, max length 71 km, is located in northwestern Québec about 133 km east of the southeastern shore of Hudson Bay. Probably formed by the impact of a METEORITE, the lake drains west via Rivière à l'Eau Claire into Lac GUILLAUME-DELISLE.

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Clayoquot Sound

Clayoquot Sound is a dramatically varied inlet of the Pacific Ocean nearly 100 km wide on the west coast of Vancouver Island (estimated area, water 784.25 km2; land including freshwater 2715.75 km2).

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Clearwater River

Clearwater River, 280 km long, rises in Patterson, Forest and Lloyd lakes in northwest Saskatchewan, flows southeast to Careen Lake and abruptly turns west to join the ATHABASCA RIVER at Fort McMurray, Alberta.

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Coast Mountains

The Coast Mountains are a continuous mountain chain extending from the Fraser Lowlands near Vancouver, 1,600 km north into the Yukon.

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Northwest Coast

 The Northwest Coast was the name given by 18th-century navigators and traders to the great arc of Pacific coast and offshore islands stretching from present-day northern California to an ill-defined point along the Alaska coast - at Prince William Sound or even Cook Inlet.

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Coast

The character of any coastline depends on a combination of factors, including topography, geology, availability of sediment, the prevailing processes of wind, wave, sea ice and tidal conditions, and longer term factors such as GLACIATION and changes in relative sea level.

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Coats Island

Coats Island, Nunavut, 5498 km 2 , is one of several islands that guard the northern entrance to Hudson Bay . Known originally as Cary Swan Nest, a name still applied to its SE point, it received its modern name from William

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Columbia Icefield

The Columbia Icefield is a mass of ice covering a high plateau between Mount Columbia (3747 m), the highest point in Alberta, and Mount Athabasca (3491 m), located between Banff and Jasper national parks, along the BC-Alberta border.

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Columbia River

The Columbia River runs from the southeast corner of British Columbia through Washington and Oregon states to the Pacific Ocean.

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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Cordillera

A cordillera is a major system of often parallel mountain ranges that includes the intervening plateaus, valleys and plains.

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Cormorant Island

Cormorant Island is a small, wooded island fringed with rock beaches close to the northeast coast of Vancouver Island. ALERT BAY, a fishing port and commercial centre for nearby logging communities, is located on its south shore. The island boasts some of the finest TOTEM POLES on the BC coast.

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Cornwall Island

Cornwall Island, 2258 km2, located in the northern ARCTIC ARCHIPELAGO, some 100 km W of Ellesmere I. It is generally low, rising to a 375 m summit towards the W. The island was discovered in 1852 by Sir Edward BELCHER and named North Cornwall.

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Cornwallis Island

Cornwallis Island, Nunavut, 6995 km2, is located between Bathurst Island and Devon Island in the Arctic Archipelago. It is separated from Somerset Island to the south by Barrow Strait. The island is generally flat, though there are prominent (400 m) cliffs along the east coast.

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Coronation Gulf

Coronation Gulf is a broad indentation in the arctic shore of the territory of Nunavut, roughly the shape of the south coast of Victoria Island, which lies directly north.