Browse "Historic sites"

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Port-Royal National Historic Site

Located in Nova Scotia, Port-Royal National Historic Site features a reconstruction of the Port-Royal Habitation, one of the first settlements attempted by the French in North America (1605). Administered by Parks Canada, this historic site offers interpretive activities that convey the French settlers’ challenges in implementing the new colony. Visitors can also learn about the culture of the Mi’kmaq, the area’s first inhabitants of the land.

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Kings Landing Historical Settlement

Kings Landing Historical Settlement is located 37 km west of Fredericton, NB. It was created in the late 1960s when the Mactaquac Dam threatened to flood many historic buildings in the Saint John River valley. Over 70 restored and reconstructed buildings and other structures are now located at Kings Landing to represent a New Brunswick settlement of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Hochelaga

The term Hochelaga historically referred to an Indigenous village the French explorer Jacques Cartier (1491-1557) visited on Sunday, 3 October 1535, during his second voyage in what is now Quebec (1535-1536). Hochelaga is an Iroquoian term which is either a variation of the word osekare, meaning “beaver path,” or of the word osheaga, which translates as “big rapids.” Today, Hochelaga refers to islands at the confluence of the St. Lawrence and the Ottawa rivers, as well as various electoral and city districts.

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Rutherford House

Rutherford House is an elegant Edwardian house built in 1909 for Alexander Cameron RUTHERFORD, the first premier of Alberta and chancellor of the UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA (1927-41).

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Kennedy House

Kennedy House is a provincial HISTORIC SITE located just north of Winnipeg on River Road, the old highway that connected the RED RIVER COLONY between LOWER FORT GARRY and UPPER FORT GARRY.

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Shand House

Shand House in WINDSOR, NS, is an ornate Victorian residence built by Clifford and Henrie Shand in 1890 as a family home. Clifford Shand was a noted bicycle racer and the son of a Windsor furniture manufacturer, and the interior of the house reflects this association with fine woodworking.

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Perkins House

 Perkins House in LIVERPOOL, NS, was built for Simeon PERKINS, who came from Connecticut and was one of the town's leading citizens in the late 18th century. Perkins was a merchant, shipowner and a colonel in the militia as well as being a judge and a member of the legislative assembly.

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Lawrence House Museum

The Lawrence House Museum in Maitland, NS, is both a national and a provincial HISTORIC SITE. It was built in about 1870 by the noted shipbuilder, William Lawrence, as a family home.

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Ross-Thomson House

The Ross-Thomson House is located in SHELBURNE, NS. At the end of the American Revolution, thousands of LOYALISTS arrived in Shelburne. Many quickly left, but others, like George and Robert Ross, settled and began businesses in the new town.

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McCulloch House

McCulloch House in PICTOU, NS, was built in about 1806 for Thomas MCCULLOCH, one of the Maritimes' leading educators and a theologian, writer and scholar of note. McCulloch arrived in Pictou in 1803 on his way to Prince Edward Island.

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Wendake (Huronia)

Early French travellers in the territory occupied by the Huron-Wendat called it le pays des Hurons ("the country of the Huron"), and residents were described as being aux Hurons ("among the Huron"), or in le pays des Hurons.

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Library of Parliament

The Library of Parliament came into being when the legislative libraries of Upper and Lower Canada were amalgamated in 1841 and situated in Montréal. In 1849 only 200 of the 12,000 books were saved when an angry mob protesting the Rebellion Losses Bill set fire to the Parliament Buildings.

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The Lost Villages

The Lost Villages are nine Canadian communities that were destroyed through the unprecedented land expropriation and construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project in the 1950s.

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Louisbourg

In the 18th century, Louisbourg was a fortified town and an important strategic capital in the French colony of Île Royale (Cape Breton Island). It was the scene of two major military sieges in the Anglo-French wars for supremacy in North America. The fall of Louisbourg to the British in 1758 paved the way for the capture of Québec and the end of French rule in North America. Today, Louisbourg is a national historic site and a popular tourist destination in Cape Breton.

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Martello Tower

The 16 squat, flat-roofed towers built in British North America from 1796 to 1848 were distributed as follows: Halifax (5), Saint John (1), Québec City (4) and Kingston (6). The towers were built during times of tension with the United States.