Browse "Historic sites"

Displaying 161-180 of 208 results
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Fort Frontenac

Frontenac reoccupied the site, rebuilding the fort in 1695, and the post became known as Fort Frontenac. Reinforced by troops under François-Charles de Bourlamaque and later the Marquis de MONTCALM, it nevertheless fell to the British under John Bradstreet in August 1758.

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Fort Victoria

In 1842, James DOUGLAS of the HUDSON'S BAY CO selected the port of Camosack (the harbour where Victoria now stands) as a new fur-trade post - eventually to replace FORT VANCOUVER as the company's Pacific headquarters and to bolster the British claim to VANCOUVER ISLAND.

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Prince of Wales Fort

Prince of Wales Fort is an 18th-century fortification built by the Hudson’s Bay Company at the mouth of the Churchill River, in what is now Manitoba. Today, it is a national historic site managed by Parks Canada.

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Fort William

Named in 1807 after NWC chief superintendent William MCGILLIVRAY, Fort William occupied a pivotal place in the company's vast trading network. In 1816-17 Lord SELKIRK occupied Fort William for 10 months as a consequence of the SEVEN OAKS INCIDENT.

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Fort Niagara

Throughout the American Revolution, Fort Niagara was the major British supply depot for the Loyalist provincial troops, Butler's Rangers, and Seneca allies who raided rebel supply lines.

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Fort Saint-Pierre

Fort Saint-Pierre is a French trading post spanning the years c. 1632 to 1669. It is situated on the southeastern shore of Cape Breton Island, in the village of St. Peters, on the Atlantic coast of a narrow isthmus separating the inland waterway of Lake Bras D'or from the open ocean.

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Lower Fort Garry

Lower Fort Garry was built 30 km down the Red River from Fort Garry [Winnipeg] during the 1830s as the Hudson's Bay Company's administrative centre for Rupert's Land. Although it never achieved the status originally intended, Lower Fort Garry served in a number of minor roles.

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Fort Selkirk

The trading post was short-lived; it shut down in the summer of its establishment after it was attacked and plundered by the Chilkat. In 1898-99 the site was the base of the YUKON FIELD FORCE. A private trading post was established by Arthur Harper around 1890.

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Fort Reliance

Fort Reliance, YT, is an abandoned post, established in 1874, located on the east bank of the YUKON RIVER, 13 km downstream from DAWSON. It remained the centre of the FUR TRADE and mining on the upper Yukon River for more than a decade.

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Fort la Reine

Fort la Reine is the name used for a series of early French fur-trade posts located west of Winnipeg on the Assiniboine River. The original fort was established in 1738 by Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de La Vérendrye and his sons, independent fur traders and explorers.

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Fort Langley

Fort Langley, established 1827 on the FRASER RIVER, 32 km east of VANCOUVER near present-day LANGLEY, BC, was important in the province's development until the post's abandonment in 1886. Part of a network of trading posts

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Fort Michilimackinac

Fort Michilimackinac (Michigan) refers to three distinct military posts at the Straits of Mackinac between lakes Huron and Michigan. French explorers arrived by 1634, establishing a mission on the north mainland in 1671 and a fort in 1690 (St Ignace, Mich).

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Fraser River Gold Rush

In 1858, around 30,000 gold seekers flooded the banks of the Fraser River from Hope to just north of Lillooet in British Columbia’s first significant gold rush. Although it dissipated by the mid-1860s, the Fraser River Gold Rush had a significant impact on the area’s Indigenous peoples and resulted in the Fraser Canyon War. Fears that the massive influx of American miners would lead the United States to annex the non-sovereign British territory known as New Caledonia also resulted in the founding of British Columbia as a colony on 2 August 1858 (see The Fraser River Gold Rush and the Founding of British Columbia). By the mid-1860s, the Fraser Rush collapsed, and British Columbia sank into a recession.

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Maison Saint-Gabriel

Maison Saint-Gabriel is a museum and historic site that openedin 1966. This 300-year-old building, located in Montréal’s Pointe-Sainte-Charles district, is one of the finest examples of the traditional architecture of New France.

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Gastown

Gastown is a retail and commercial district in Vancouver, British Columbia. It is bounded by Cordova Street and the waterfront between Richards Street and Main Street. The original Gastown settlement formed the nucleus for the City of Vancouver and is now a National Historic Site. Today, Gastown is a popular tourist destination and home to restaurants, gift shops, boutiques, galleries, nightclubs and bars. It is also part of the Downtown Eastside, Vancouver’s lowest-income neighbourhood, and the location of single resident occupancy hotels, social housing and social services.

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Haliburton House

Haliburton House, a 1½ storey villa in WINDSOR, NS, was built in 1836 and originally set in a 16 ha estate. It was the home of Thomas Chandler HALIBURTON, one of Nova Scotia's most famous 19th-century figures.