Browse "Education"

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Bishop Strachan School

The Bishop Strachan School is an all-girls independent school in Toronto. It was founded in 1867, and today remains committed to its original mission of preparing young women to be leaders.

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Bishop’s University

Bishop’s University is a public anglophone university located in the Lennoxville borough of the town of Sherbrooke, Québec. It primarily offers undergraduate programs. One of the smallest and oldest universities in Canada, Bishop’s boasts a campus with 550 acres of green space.

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School Boards

School boards are groups of elected (with exceptions) members of a community to whom the provinces have delegated authority over some aspects of education. There were about 800 school boards in Canada in the early 1990s.

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Brandon University

 Brandon U offers both undergraduate and graduate courses in arts, science, education and music. It is currently the home base for the SCOPE (Study of Cultural Adaptations in the Canadian Prairie Ecozone) project.

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Cape Breton University

Cape Breton University, SYDNEY, NS, was first established as the University College of Cape Breton (UCCB) in 1974, by the amalgamation of the Sydney campus (Xavier Junior College) of ST FRANCIS XAVIER UNIVERSITY (established 1951) with the Nova Scotia Eastern Institute of Technology (founded 1968).

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University of British Columbia

In 1920 honours courses, extension services and summer sessions were introduced, and McGill's Victoria College in Victoria became an affiliate of the university. In 1925 UBC moved to its permanent site on the Vancouver campus. Expansion of the campus was virtually at a standstill during the 1930s.

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Educational Broadcasting

Educational broadcasting refers to TELEVISION PROGRAMMING and RADIO PROGRAMMING providing or related to courses of study. The term "educational" is also applied at times to other programs that are particularly enlightening, informative or intellectually stimulating.

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Brock University

In the late 1950s, there was growing public support for the establishment of a university in the Niagara region, so that young people could obtain a good education locally.

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New Brunswick Schools Question

In May 1871, the government of New Brunswick, under George Luther Hatheway, passed the Common Schools Act. This statute provided for free standardized education throughout the province, the establishment of new school districts, the construction of schools, and stricter requirements regarding teaching certificates. This law also made all schools non-denominational, so that the teaching of the Roman Catholic catechism was prohibited.

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University of Calgary

By 1969 the U of C had established many of the programs offered by larger Canadian universities. In 1991, the year of its 25th anniversary, the U of C had more than 20 000 full-time and part-time students, with almost 4000 academic and staff positions.

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University Campuses

The word "campus" has acquired considerable reach and resonance. It now can be applied to almost any group of buildings with a common purpose on a landscaped site. There are office campuses, health campuses, industrial campuses and research campuses.

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Education in Canada

 Education is a basic activity of human association in any social group or community, regardless of size. It is a part of the regular interaction within a family, business or nation.

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Semaines sociales du Canada

Semaines sociales du Canada, annual conferences started in 1920 by Jesuit Fr Joseph-Papin ARCHAMBAULT and organizers from the École sociale populaire. The goal was to train an elite who would spread a Christian spirit and the church's SOCIAL DOCTRINE throughout Québec's mores, institutions and laws.

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Education of Indigenous Peoples in Canada

Before contact with Europeans, Indigenous peoples educated their youth through traditional means — demonstration, group socialization, participation in cultural and spiritual rituals, skill development and oral teachings. The introduction of European classroom-style education as part of a larger goal of assimilation disrupted traditional methods and resulted in cultural trauma and dislocation. Reformers of Indigenous education policies are attempting to reintegrate traditional teachings and provide more cultural and language-based support to enhance and improve the outcomes of Indigenous children in the education system.