Browse "Politics & Law"

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Socialism

Socialism is a political doctrine that criticizes the existence of social, economic and political inequality in society. Seeking to lessen class inequality, socialists call for a redistribution of power from the affluent owners to the working class.

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Solidarity

In May 1983 British Columbians voted the Social Credit Party, headed by William BENNETT, into office. Two months later, on July 7, the Socreds introduced their so-called Restraint Budget, accompanied by 26 prospective bills.

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Sovereign

Under Canada’s constitutional monarchy, the sovereign is head of state, the legal foundation of the executive branch of government and one part of Parliament — along with the Senate and House of Commons. The current sovereign of Canada is Queen Elizabeth II.

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Sovereignty

Sovereignty is an abstract legal concept that also has political, social and economic implications. In strictly legal terms, it describes the power or authority of a state to govern itself and its subjects. In this sense, sovereignty is the highest source of the law. With Confederation and the passage of the British North America Act, 1867, Canada’s Parliament was still legally under the authority of the British Parliament. By 1949, Canada had become fully sovereign in relation to Great Britain through landmark legislation passed overseas, including the Statute of Westminster (1931). The Constitution Act, 1982 swept away any leftover authority that remained with Britain. Questions of sovereignty have also been raised by Indigenous peoples in Canada and by separatists in Quebec, who for a time championed the concept of sovereignty-association.

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Stabilization

Stabilization refers to government MONETARY POLICY, FISCAL POLICY, or other actions taken with the goal of minimizing BUSINESS CYCLE fluctuations in important economy-wide variables - especially employment, output and INFLATION.

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Welfare State

The welfare state in Canada is a multi-billion dollar system of government programs that transfer money and services to Canadians to deal with an array of societal needs.

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Stornoway

Stornoway, located at 541 Acacia Ave in the Village of Rockcliffe Park, near Ottawa, is the official residence of the LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION . A simple and commodious 2-storey, stucco-sheathed house located in spacious

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Succession (Wills)

When a person dies, that person's property or its value is transferred to the persons entitled to it after payment of any outstanding debts and liabilities; this process is described as succession.

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Women's Suffrage

Women in Canada obtained the right to vote in a sporadic fashion. Federal authorities granted them the franchise in 1918, more than two years after the women of Manitoba became the first to vote at the provincial level in 1916.

Macleans

Terrorism Summit

Terrorism is not a new curse. There was a time when the most fearsome terrorist of the day was "Carlos" Sanchez, better remembered by his flashier nom de guerre, The Jackal.

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Think Tank

A think tank is an interdisciplinary body of experts such as scholars or former politicians that crafts opinions on regional, national or international policy and strategic direction, typically related to areas such as commerce, the military, immigration or social welfare.

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Tax

Tax is an enforced contribution exacted pursuant to legislative authority in order to raise revenue for a public purpose. The first recorded tax in Canada appears to date back to 1650 when an export tax of 50% on all beaver pelts and 10% on moose belts was levied on the residents of New France.

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Tory

Tory [Irish tóraidhe, "pursuer"], name applied to members of the CONSERVATIVE PARTY and its antecedents. The name originated as an epithet for dispossessed Irish "papists" who plundered English settlers and soldiers in Ireland.

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Treason

Treason is probably the oldest and most serious offence in political society, with the possible exception of murder. The earliest English treason legislation, which dates from 1351, is the basis of all treason legislation in the English-speaking world.

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Williams Treaties

The Williams Treaties were signed in October and November 1923 by the governments of Canada and Ontario and by seven First Nations of the Chippewa of Lake Simcoe and the Mississauga of the north shore of Lake Ontario. As the last historic land cession treaties in Canada, these agreements transferred over 20,000 km2 of land in southcentral Ontario to the Crown; in exchange, Indigenous signatories received one-time cash payments. While Chippewa and Mississauga peoples argue that the Williams Treaties also guaranteed their right to hunt and fish on the territory, the federal and provincial governments have interpreted the treaty differently, resulting in legal disputes and ongoing negotiations between the three parties about land rights.