Browse "Sports & Recreation"

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Water Skiing

Water skiing is a sport in which competitors slalom, perform tricks, and jump on water skis while being towed by a speedboat. The sport was derived from snow SKIING and aquaplaning and was started in the US by Ralph Samuelson in 1922. It is perhaps the fastest-growing, all-family competitive sport.

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Snowboarding

Snowboarding is the sport of riding a large flat ski downhill over snow. Unlike downhill skiing, snowboarding does not require the use of poles and both feet are placed sideways on the same board. A relative newcomer to the family of winter sports, snowboarding began to gain popularity in the 1960s and rose in status from the latest "gimmick" to an accredited Olympic event in 1998, a relatively short period of time. Canadians have had great success over the years in international snowboarding at the Olympic Winter Games, Winter X Games and World Snowboarding Championships. Eight Canadian snowboarders have won Olympic medals — Ross Rebagliati, Dominique Maltais, Mike Robertson, Maëlle Ricker, Jasey-Jay Anderson, Mark McMorris, Max Parrot and Laurie Blouin. Rebagliati, Ricker and Anderson won Olympic gold, while Maltais and McMorris are multiple medallists.

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Snowmobiling

After an initial growth in the sport of snowmobiling through the 1970s, participation and the sale of new snowmobiles fell off in the early 1980s. In recent years, however, snowmobiling participation has seen a dramatic increase

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Snowshoeing

Snowshoeing is a form of physical activity that uses two wooden-frame "shoes," each strung together with interlaced webbing, to walk or run over snow.

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Soccer

Soccer (Association Football) is a sport played by two teams of 11 players each, using a round ball, usually on a grass field called the "pitch."

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Solitaire

Solitaire is the common name for 13 species of New World thrushes, one of which occurs in Canada.

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Speed Swimming

Swimming was considered to be an important survival skill by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans but was not contested as a sport.

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Sportfishing

Fishing for sport as well as for food is inseparable from the history of human evolution. Some of the earliest evidence can be seen in rock shelter carvings of fish before 10 000 BC and in 5000-year-old Egyptian drawings of anglers.

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Synchronized Swimming

The governing body of synchronized swimming in Canada is Synchro Canada. The basic skills of synchronized swimming are strokes and figures, which were originally part of the Royal Life Saving Society program.

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Table Tennis

Table tennis is played by 2 (singles) or 4 (doubles) players, normally indoors. Opponents face each other and hit the ball with a racquet, alternately, over a 6-inch (15.25 cm) net stretched midway across a 9 x 5 ft (274 cm x 152.5 cm) table.

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Tennis

Modern tennis almost certainly originated in France in the 11th century as a form of handball called le jeu de paume. The game, also called "court tennis" or "real tennis," was played on an indoor court - originally in a monastery - with a ball, and by 1500 a racquet was introduced.

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Toboggan

Historically among subarctic Aboriginal groups, the toboggan was a common means of hauling small loads or people over snow. Typically, toboggans were constructed of two or more thin boards of larch or birch wood, secured to one

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Triathlon

The first recorded triathlon was held in California in 1974 by the San Diego Track and Field Club at Mission Bay. There are now more than 6 million athletes participating in the sport worldwide and almost 100 national federations.

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Vezina Trophy

The Vezina Trophy is awarded to the best goaltender in the National Hockey League during the regular season. Created in 1927 in honour of Georges Vézina, who died in 1926 at the age of 39, the trophy was originally awarded to the goaltender with the best goals-against average. Beginning in 1946, it was presented to the main goalie for the team that had allowed the fewest goals in the regular season; in 1965, it was expanded to include all of the team’s goalies who had played in at least 25 games. Since 1982, the winner has been determined by a vote among all NHL general managers. Voting occurs at the end of the regular season and the trophy is handed out during the NHL Awards, following the Stanley Cup playoffs.

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Volleyball

The playing court, 18 m x 9 m, is divided by a centreline. Above the centreline is an extended net, placed 2.43 m high for men and 2.24 m high for women. The goal of the game is to send the ball, according to the regulations, over the net to the floor on the opposite court.

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Weightlifting

 This spectacular indoor sport is composed of 2 events: the snatch, and the clean and jerk. In the snatch, the athlete lifts the bar to arm's length in one continuous motion. In the clean and jerk, he lifts the bar to his shoulders, then jerks it overhead to arm's length.

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Wrestling

Humans wrestled first for survival and eventually for sport; in fact, drawings on cave walls portray a form of freestyle wrestling. Wall paintings in Egyptian tombs from about 2000 BC depict matches that show moves very similar to those practised today.

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Yachting

Yachting refers to races of watercraft using sail power only. Competitors are required to complete a prescribed course in the shortest possible time, passing marker buoys in the correct order and on the correct side.