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Winnipeg Free Press

Owner and newspaper were ideologically reunited in 1917, when the Free Press backed Union Government and Conscription. During the 1920s, however, Dafoe and Sifton returned to the Liberal fold to support Mackenzie King and his government.

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Winnipeg General Strike of 1919

The Winnipeg General Strike of 1919 was the largest strike in Canadian history (see Strikes and Lockouts). Between 15 May and 25 June 1919, more than 30,000 workers left their jobs (see Work). Factories, shops, transit and city services shut down. The strike resulted in arrests, injuries and the deaths of two protestors. It did not immediately succeed in empowering workers and improving job conditions. But the strike did help unite the working class in Canada (see Labour Organization). Some of its participants helped establish what is now the New Democratic Party.

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This is the full-length entry about the Winnipeg General Strike of 1919. For a plain-language summary, please see Winnipeg General Strike of 1919 (Plain-language Summary).

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Winnipeg Male Voice Choir

Winnipeg Male Voice Choir. An enterprise of the Men's Music Club. Founded in 1916 as a quartet of club members, it had increased by 1918 to 46. On the death in 1920 of its founding conductor, George Price, Cyril F. Musgrove was brought from England to take over the choir.

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Winnipeg Oratorio Society

Winnipeg Oratorio Society. Founded in 1908 by John J. Moncrieff and others, to provide Winnipeg with a major choir drawn from the city's many church choirs and capable of undertaking large-scale choral works.

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Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

Piero Gamba became music director in 1971, a position he held until the fall of 1980. In 1979 he led the WSO in a gala concert at Carnegie Hall. Kazuhiro Koizumi became music director in 1983, and in the 6 years he served with the WSO the orchestra's subscriber base rose to more than 10 000 patrons.

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Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

In 1944, with the prospects for a symphony orchestra for Winnipeg enhanced by the CBC's plans for a regular broadcasting orchestra, the Winnipeg Civic Music League was organized. The league established a joint stock company, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra Ltd.

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Winnipeg's Contemporary Dancers

 Winnipeg's Contemporary Dancers is Canada's longest operating modern dance company. WCD, a company of about 10 dancers, traces its roots to a student group formed in 1964 by former ROYAL WINNIPEG BALLET dancer Rachel BROWNE. It was recognized as fully professional by 1971.

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Winter

Winter occurs as the Earth's axis tilts away from the sun during the planet's annual rotation. The portion of the Earth that is furthest from the sun experiences winter, with weather that is colder than the other seasons. In the Northern Hemisphere, winter officially begins with the winter solstice, around 21 December, and ends at the spring equinox, around 21 March. Winter figures largely in Canada's climate, cultural experience and mythology. Every aspect of life in Canada is affected by winter, whether by heavy rains on the West Coast, isolation during the long Arctic winters, raging blizzards across the prairies or huge snowfalls in eastern Canada. Winter is reflected in Canadian art, literature, music, fashion, pastimes and attitudes.

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Winter Solstice

About 30 minutes in length, the work has three movements: I The Darkest Hour, II Simulacrum, III The Prophet of Light. Hatzis explains that the title refers to the spiritual meaning of the "longest night" and that the work "...is a meditation on our own times ...

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Winter Themes in Music

In the 19th century a number of winter-inspired piano pieces or songs for voice and piano were published, including Canadian Winter Galop (1864 or before) by Charles J. Millar, Winter Carnival March (1884) by C.A.

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Wintergreen

Wintergreen is the common name for smooth, low-growing, woodland, herbaceous plants in genus Pyrola of the wintergreen family (Pyrolaceae). These plants were known to the Cree as "beaver's ears" because of their small, round, evergreen leaves. Nine of the 12 known species are native to Canada.

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Wired Revolution on Campus

Nursing professor Ellie MacFarlane is a self-confessed "technological klutz," the type of person who finds programming a videocassette recorder a daunting experience. So it was with some trepidation that she learned last year that St.